mr_cellaneous: (cat)
[personal profile] mr_cellaneous
Paul: I think of enthusiasm as the opposite of coolness, and adolescence is a turning point for this. Children are all enthusiastic, they're into what they're into, and it's great and they love it. But then something happens, and suddenly some of the kids start looking down on that enthusiasm and seeing it as immature or dorky. So they invent coolness as an alternative. I always gravitated away from that because I was interested in too many things.

Adam Savage: Yes, and enthusiasm also makes you vulnerable. When you like something, someone can take it away from you. I once gave a sculpture to some friends as a wedding present, and they turned it down. That was really upsetting to me. And that vulnerability itself is also embarrassing. The two emotions are deeply linked, which is why people try not to cry in public.

Date: 2009-11-30 05:18 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Good quotes. That's what coolness is - invulnerability, which is so admired by teenagers because they're so incredibly vulnerable. As kids, their parents (should) protect them and the kids may not know the difference anyway. Their lives may not be idyllic, but lucky kids get a good window in there.

In adolescence, their bodies are awkward, smelly and unpredictable, they're super-charged on hormones, and the list of things they haven't learned how to do is taller than they are. So hiding the turmoil becomes the whole game, and the ones who do it best are recognized as champions. They pay the price in other ways, though. That's why it's so charming to see Fonzie expressing enthusiasm for something, or Mr. Spock overjoyed to see his friend Kirk still alive.

Date: 2009-11-30 05:19 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] colonelhandsome.livejournal.com
Good quotes. That's what coolness is - invulnerability, which is so admired by teenagers because they're so incredibly vulnerable. As kids, their parents (should) protect them and the kids may not know the difference anyway. Their lives may not be idyllic, but lucky kids get a good window in there.

In adolescence, their bodies are awkward, smelly and unpredictable, they're super-charged on hormones, and the list of things they haven't learned how to do is taller than they are. So hiding the turmoil becomes the whole game, and the ones who do it best are recognized as champions. They pay the price in other ways, though. That's why it's so charming to see Fonzie expressing enthusiasm for something, or Mr. Spock overjoyed to see his friend Kirk still alive.

Date: 2009-11-30 05:19 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] colonelhandsome.livejournal.com
Damn - guy before me said everything I was going to.

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